Down N' Dirty: CEP Ski Ultralight Socks
94%Overall Score
Durability94%
Versatility90%
Comfort98%
Features97%
Value91%

CEP has their design dialed when it comes to compression socks, and their ultralight ski socks have all the desired comfort in your boots, as well as performance and recovery during and after your day on the slopes.

I wore the socks for a morning session of uphill ski touring on Vail Mountain, followed by some lift-served laps.

I love sliding the socks on and feeling the hold they have on my feet and the lower half of my legs. The fabric has a defining compression that is meant to increase blood flow, designed to keep your feet warmer and to also carry away metabolic waste products from the muscles for accelerated recovery.

On the ski socks, padded zones where ski boots typically drive into you keep the comfort level high, and CEP’s merino wool and antimicrobial fabric absorbs moisture and sweat, wicking it away from skin and allowing it to evaporate more quickly.

My feet were comfortable all day, and they actually looked pristine after just coming out of my boots. For the first time I have seen, my feet, ankles and calves didn’t have swollen areas or red marks from rubbing — just happy feet that experienced a flow of increased circulation all day long in ski boots.

Pros: The compression fit of these thin and light ski socks not only helps with circulation in your legs and feet, but they also alleviate any chance bunching, rubbing or blisters in your boots. If you’re sweating on an ascent, the socks moisture wick, and the temperature regulation carries through even once you start the downhill.

Cons: These socks are a $60 investment per pair, and they won’t last you a lifetime (they are meant to hold up their compression for 200 wears). And if it’s a freezing day, these socks can only do so much for warmth and you’ll likely need boot heaters to really feel toasty toes.

Where I Took It: 90-minute uphill skin followed by another couple hours of lift-served skiing on a mild weather day on Vail Mountain.

Kim Fuller is a freelance writer based in Vail, Colorado. 

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